Die Produktion von nachhaltigen H2 ist Schlüsseltechnologie für die Wasserstoffwirtschaft. An der TU-Darmstadt wird an den Kerntechnologien der alkalischen und saueren Wasserelektrolyse und der Vergasung von Biomasse oder Reststoffen zur Gewinnung von Wasserstoff gearbeitet. Auch die direkte Nutzung der im Elektrolyseur erzeugten Protonen/Hydroxidionen zur chemischen Synthese ohne Freisetzung von Wasserstoff wird untersucht:

Kurzportrait involvierter Arbeitsgruppen und Kontaktdaten

Research Focus

Research at the Institute for Reactive Flows and Measurement (RSM) focuses on chemically reactive flows with relevance for mobility, energy conversion and process engineering applications. Our goal here is to increase the efficiency of technical systems while minimizing pollutant emissions.

To achieve these goals, we use advanced optical measurement methods to gain a detailed understanding of the underlying physicochemical processes involved in transport, chemical conversion, and multiphase phenomena. Our experimental data contribute to a better understanding of the underlying processes. In cooperation with numerous research institutes, mathematical models describing chemically reactive flows are improved and meaningful data sets are obtained, which are used to validate numerical simulations.

For the usage of hydrogen as an energy carrier thermochemical conversion in combustion engines and gas turbines is investigated. We are also looking into electrolysis for the production of hydrogen and the use of alternative energy carriers such as ammonia, e-fuels or iron, which offer potential for efficient storage and transport of hydrogen.

Contact

Institute for Reactive Flow and Diagnostics

Departement of Mechanical Engineering

Research Focus

Research at the EST comprises several areas of energy technology and production of hydrogen or other basic chemicals or synthetic fuels. The focus is on the development, optimization and scale-up of several energy supply processes as well as the development of measurement technology for the quantitative assessment of theses processes.

Sustainable energy supply is defined by a targeted decarbonisation and emission reduction in the energy sector as well as improved availability and cost effectiveness of the processes in use.

To reach these goals, research at the EST is structured into the three areas „Gasification & Innovative Energy Conversion Crocesses“, „CO2 Capture“, and „Power Plant and Fluidized Bed Technology“.

Methods

The methods include numerical approaches, such as process simulations and CFD, as well as experimental investigations. One highlight is our unique 1 MWth pilot plant that has been used for the investigation of various processes under industrial conditions.

Contact

Institute for Energy Systems and Technology

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Research Focus

In the etzoldlab the challenges arising with the needed global energy change and future sustainable feedstock supply for chemical industry are the major research guideline. From the perspective of chemical engineering, a multidisciplinary approach is employed to provide scientific solutions for these challenges, especially for the complex interplay of catalytic materials within a full process or device. In the scientific approach, generic experiments play a dominant role. They allow controlling process conditions from highly idealized towards technically realistic and are combined with diagnostics providing in-situ information. Chemical reaction engineering simulations complement the experiments, giving especially insights into complex mass transfer phenomena and, therefore making a more holistic picture possible. As a future sustainable energy and chemical industry will need a concerted interaction of electrochemical and classical heterogeneous catalyzed processes both are studied. Based on this strategy, the research of the etzoldlab can be divided in three strongly interacting sub-groups: Advanced Catalytic Materials – Electrochemical Energy Conversion Processes – Heterogeneous Catalysis and Processes.

Contact

Chemical Technology

Department of Chemistry

Forschungsfokus

The mission of the Surface Science Laboratory at TU Darmstadt is to improve the fundamental understanding of chemical and physical processes and their dynamics at interfaces and surfaces of materials for energy conversion and storage.

The group uses sophisticated methods of surface analysis integrated with the preparation of tailored model systems with the aim to measure interfaces with high temporal and spatial resolution and chemical specificity. The aim is to better understand chemical processes of charge and mass transfer in, e.g., electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reactions for renewable energy conversion (green H2 production, CO2 reduction, H2 usage in fuel cells) for deriving structure-performance relationships to be used in knowledge-based materials and device design.

We operate integrated vacuum systems combining several methods, such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS), scanning probe microscopy (STM, AFM), vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR, HREELS) and electron diffraction with the preparation of thin film model systems. Besides investigation under well-defined conditions we also study realistic samples under (close to industrial) operating conditions (in situ/in operando) with modern synchrotron spectroscopy and diffraction techniques.

Contact

Surface Science

Department of Materials and Earth Sciences

Research Focus

  • Expertise in thermal, electrochemical and photochemical nitrogen activation, water oxidation and oxygen reduction
  • Hydrogen storage in secondary materials, such as ammonia and hydrocarbons
  • Prediction of catalyst properties through computational chemistry and theoretical spectroscopy
  • Calculation of thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of catalysts, including targeted optimization
  • Computational chemistry and quantum chemistry with single- and multi-reference methods; prediction and analysis of electronic structures in transition metal compounds

Contact

Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry

Department of Chemistry

Research Focus

Our group concentrates on the preparation of heterogeneous catalysts and on their electrocatalytic evaluation. Especially important are high surface area materials with controllable size, facets and functional groups that are cost-efficient and scalable. Through a systematic approach of first characterizing model surfaces and then transferring them to nanoparticulate systems, we create the basis for application-oriented materials that can be used e.g. in fuel cells or electrolysers. Many of the fundamentals of both fields are very closely interlinked (surface potential, double layer, etc.) and we use the best of both worlds to obtain a deeper understanding of catalytic processes. The catalytic reactions include the oxygen reduction reaction, the oxygen evolution reaction, the hydrogen evolution reaction and the carbon dioxide reduction. Our research is supported by fundamental studies on the growth mechanisms and the subsequent development of new materials. Innovative, automated characterization techniques are used to evaluate the catalyst’s performance. This enables the examination of numerous materials in a short time and thus accelerates the discovery of new materials. The corresponding reaction mechanisms that are essential for understanding the underlying processes are examined.

Contact

Electrochemistry

Department of Chemistry

Research Focus

The Computational Multiphase Flow group develops simulation methods for the computer-aided prediction of transport processes in multiphase flows. By means of detailed simulations the group is seeking to understand fundamental properties of multiphase systems. For this, high-fidelity simulation methods for the computer-aided prediction of the involved transport processes are developed. The scientific focus is on the open-source C++ library OpenFOAM for computational continuum physics and multiphysics, where the group is concerned with methods particularly suited for scale-bridging and/or coupled processes at interfaces. The overarching goal is to enable simulations of systems with realistic material properties and under real operating conditions – going beyond Computational Fluid Dynamics.

H2 related Reserach Topics

  • Water transport in low temperature PEM fuel cells
  • Bubble detachment at electrodes in electrolyzers

Methods

  • Sharp & diffuse interface capturing methods
  • Moving mesh interface tracking methods
  • Fluid solid interaction
  • Adaptive and hybrid approaches

Contact

Computational Multiphase Flow

Departement of Mathematics

Research Focus

  • Functional nanomaterials
  • Gas adsorption and purification
  • Carbon nanomaterials for adsorption and catalysis
  • Materials synthesis
  • Porous materials as adsorbents
  • Iron based catalysts

Research

  • Electrochemistry methods
  • Adsorptivity techniques
  • Gas sensing techniques

Contact

Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie

Department of Chemistry

Research Focus

The research interests of the group Materials and Resources are advanced synthesis techniques including microwave-heated, plasma-based, and soft chemistry methods as well as the development of (self-)regenerative properties of the materials during dynamic energy conversion processes. The in-house designed energy conversion materials cover the fields of thermoelectrics, power-to-X, and photo(electro)catalysis.

Contact

Materials & Resources

Department of Materials and Earth Sciences

Research Focus

  • High-throughput design of tandem photovoltaic materials integrated in artificial photosynthesis devices
  • Machine learning modelling of the crystalline environments and x-ray absorption spectroscopy for operando electro-/photo-catalysis
  • Engineering of magnetocaloric materials for hydrogen liquefaction
  • CALPHAD modelling of the high-temperature Fe-O phase diagrams
  • Designing two-dimensional electro-catalytic materials for water splitting

Contact

Theory of Magnetic Materials

Department of Material Science